Not educated on mental health? STOP TALKING!

The day I found out I was diagnosed with BPD I went home and googled everything about it (I still do to this day) I learn about symptoms, treatments, others experiences, I read blogs, watch videos. You name it I do it. But even with me doing this, I’m no expert, not even close. But I do like to spread awareness on what I know. With that said there is an article about mental illness, and let me warn you its very inaccurate. I was seething when I read it, and even tried to educate the author a little on twitter. The link is here and I will quote what rubbed me the wrong way.

As a result, I don’t view mental illness as a scary, strange thing or as a form of weakness. Do you? I doubt it. And because we are talking more openly than we might have done in the past, many employers have become more attuned to dealing with it. If a workplace failed in this duty of care, there would, rightly, be outrage.

 

I beg to differ, mental illness is very scary, especially with what I have. You never know when a mood swing is coming, and how your day will go. Most times people with BPD avoid going places for this reason. Here is another quote

Does that apply to mental health? Increasingly, I would say the answer is no. Yes, we should keep talking about depression. Yes, we should be profoundly sensitive to those who grapple with it every day of their lives. But let’s stop saying there’s a stigma attached to it.

This quote right here, made me want to reach through my computer. She is saying there isn’t a stigma when there is, everywhere. Tell a stranger you have a mental illness, they automatically assume you should be locked up in a hospital or that you can’t function with the rest of society. This is simply not true, which is why there is a stigma. Its our job (as in the mental illness category) to erase that stigma, and prove people wrong.

-Kristen

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Kristen Iness

Mother Wife Living with BPD 'tis all

2 thoughts on “Not educated on mental health? STOP TALKING!”

  1. I hated that article, even though don’t like using the word “stigma” to define what we go through. It’s more like openly accepted discrimination. I guess, that’s just a semantic argument on my part. In any case, the kind of depression she talks about not being discriminated against sounds an awful like feeling a little low, or sad, instead of lethargic, emotionless, painful life ending depression. Of course, it’s easy for people to identify with the word “depression” when nobody is using it correctly. They all seem to think that it means feeling a little sad. They’ve never had years where everything they’ve done has been meaningless and the only consistent though in their head was ending it all. They’ve never had to spend weeks getting up enough energy to take a shower. They’ve never been so worn down that even changing the channel or eating was hard to do.

    That’s not even taking into account what people with borderline, bipolar, or schizophrenia have to go through when they talk about their problems openly. I’m sure we all know how well that works. I’m sure we’ve all had “friends” who turned their backs on us. Or even family members after we went out on a tightrope and told them what we were going through. In my own case, even before I was diagnoses I lost all of my friends, and contact with most of my family because of my inability to maintain consistent relationships of any kind for years at a time.

    Then, there’s the whole “character flaw” belief system people seem to have. They blame us for things that are actually key symptoms of our diagnosis, as if we could will them away. If you act in an unpredictable or inconsistent way then it’s because you’re flaky. You can’t use your illness as an “excuse” they say, while talking about how drinking lowered their own inhibitions and they accidentally slept with somebody they never would have in a million years. Only some of us are walking around in a chemically drunk state even when we’re sober. It’s never acceptable to the general public to not take 100% responsibility for being mentally ill.

    To them, you’re a bad person, a morally corrupt one, not an ill one. You could “choose” not to act this way. You could exercise, think positive thoughts, and become a completely normal person if you wanted to. Only we all know that isn’t even remotely true.

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    1. What you said here was 100% spot on

      ” Of course, it’s easy for people to identify with the word “depression” when nobody is using it correctly. They all seem to think that it means feeling a little sad. They’ve never had years where everything they’ve done has been meaningless and the only consistent though in their head was ending it all. They’ve never had to spend weeks getting up enough energy to take a shower. They’ve never been so worn down that even changing the channel or eating was hard to do.”

      So many people throw the word depressed around without knowing what it means. They think because theyre a little sad that means they’re depressed. No you can snap out of that, we can’t.

      The whole thing about using being drunk as an excuse as opposed to using a mental illness as an “excuse” is correct also. Like we choose to be this way. Because yes I choose to lay in the bed and question my life existence on a daily basis, this is exactly what I want to do, everyday.

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